WELCOME

 

Taste enthusiast? Life explorer? You’ve come to the right place. Let’s travel together through the culture of flavors and conviviality. Discover curiosities, learn about the most peculiar recipes and ingredients as well as the quintessentials. Be inspired by experiences of the finest taste experts.

Travel

Taste Guides

 

A journey through local flavors

  • CREOLE GOES FUSION

    In many global cities, fusion has become a byword for twenty -first-century gastronomic excess: see New York’s pizza burgers and Singapore’s instant noodle sandwiches. But not so in Lima, the city whose culinary tradition took root as a Hispanic riff on the Incan cooking pot. Later, waves of early nineteenth-century Chinese immigration to the city gave rise to creole cuisines such as Chifa, the Chinese-Peruvian flavour combinations that remain a fond favourite with everyday Limeños; in classic dishes such as arroz chaufa, fried rice with plump white corn, or lomo saltado (beef tenderloin flash - fried in a wok with soy sauce). Chifa's cousin arrived with Japanese migrants in the 1890s, who came to work as fishermen on Lima’s rich shores, married Peruvians, and in Nikkei, a cuisine rich in sashimi and bright citrus flavours, recreated a taste of home. Today Nikkei is one of the most refined of Lima’s fusion cuisines, its apotheosis the fine - dining Peruvian-Japanese restaurant Maido, whose Osaka-trained head chef Mitsuharu Tsumura has given the Peruvian capital the surprisingly glorious barbecued guinea pig (the hallowed food of the Andean Incas) with yucca cream. Meanwhile the chefs behind Novoandina, or the Andean culinary renaissance that began in the 1980s, have also taken up the baton for Lima’s globe-plunderingculinary iconoclasm in dishes such as Cucho La Rosa’s iconic quinotto (quinoa risotto, today the star of me nus from London to LA) and celebrity chef Gastón Acurio’s chicken liver anticuchos (an Incan form of kebab) served meltingly pink with spicy salsa ají amarillo.

PER

Deactive
2016-10-24

IR

Deactive
2016-10-24

UK

Active
2017-06-16
Active
2017-06-16

FR

Active
2017-05-19
Active
2017-05-19

CN

Active
2017-04-21
Active
2017-04-21

DE

Active
2017-03-24
Active
2017-03-24

US

Active
2017-02-24
Active
2017-02-24

DK

Active
2017-02-10

ES

Active
2017-01-13
Active
2017-01-13

IT

Active
2016-12-16
Active
2016-12-16

CH

Active
2016-11-18
Active
2016-11-18

CA

Deactive
Deactive

HK

Deactive
2016-09-13

AU

Deactive
2016-09-13

BE

Deactive
Deactive

Taste Inspirations

Secrets of taste

 

A stroll through the history of the most beloved ingredients

“The Distillers have found out a way to hit the palate of the Poor, by their new fashion'd compound Waters called ‘Geneva’, so that the common People seem not to value the French brandy as usual, and even not to desire it.” So wrote Robinson Crusoe author Daniel Defoe in 1726.

 

Is there a more English meal than a roasted joint of glistening beef, served with Yorkshire pudding and roast potatoes and slathered in rich gravy? Just see Richard Leveridge's 1735 song “Roast beef of Old England” for proof (dodgy rhyming scheme aside):

 

Eating oysters, the French poet Léon-Paul Fargue once said, was “like kissing the sea on the lips”. Anyone who has consumed one of said molluscs will know exactly what he meant. The salty, slightly sour ozone taste of a freshly shucked oyster contains the distilled essence of the ocean.

 

It feels particularly French to bestow upon salt’s most rarefied form the poetic designation of “fleur de sel” – “flower of salt”. The name is given to the delicate crystals raked from the liquid surface of salt beds in the coastal town of Camargue on the Mediterranean, and Guérande, the island of Noirmoutier and the Île de Ré on the Atlantic coast.

Taste Origins

Tales from Taste Lovers

Once upon a Bite

The Beatles & scrambled eggs

What would have happened if Paul McCartney had never come up with the words for Yesterday?

The Beatles & scrambled eggs

Get in touch

Sign in with
Sign in with your email address
Don't have an account
Country
ASIA PACIFIC
Site Language: English
Select Country
asia
Australia
Belgium
Canada
Chile
Denmark
France
Germany
Italy
Peru
Spain
Switzerland
Uk
USA