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Taste enthusiast? Life explorer? You’ve come to the right place. Let’s travel together through the culture of flavors and conviviality. Discover curiosities, learn about the most peculiar recipes and ingredients as well as the quintessentials. Be inspired by experiences of the finest taste experts.

Travel

Taste Guides

 

A journey through local flavors

  • Old School Santiago

    While Santiago, with its glass towers and progressive mass-transit network, may seem modern and minimalist in some neighbourhoods, if you peel back a few layers of history, the sometimes more dive-y origins of the city begin to reveal themselves. Santiago’s old-school atmosphere can best be found in a picada, the traditional drinking dens that dot the city with cheap drinks to pair with heavy meat and potato dishes. Be on the lookout for the Terremoto, a combination of a young wine called pipeño, with a scoop of ice cream and a few other ingredients. Parts of the city retain the neo-classical architecture of the past century, inspired by nineteenth-century Europe. There’s intricate ironwork throughout the 1872 Mercado Central, while neighborhoods like Lastarria or Bellas Artes feature townhouses with stone façades and iron light posts that, despite being restored in recent years, seem much like they did decades before. As Santiago becomes more refined and contemporary, the old city is becoming more obscure, like the cafes con piernas, coffee shops with provocatively dressed female wait staff, which are getting pushed further and further out of public view. Yet, with the right set of eyes on the tree- lined cobblestone streets of Bellavista, you can still enter the world of Pablo Neruda, the Chilean poet and senator who won the Noble Prize for literature in 1971, and who served wine to his guests at his home in kitschy coloured glasses that he picked up around Chile and on his travels abroad.

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Taste Inspirations

Secrets of taste

 

A stroll through the history of the most beloved ingredients

 

Think of South American cuisine and razor clams are not likely to be the first thing that will spring to mind – especially when the continent’s litany of colourful street food, grilled meats, stews, salads and soups are so well--known. But the region’s seafood and, in particular, its razor clams –“navajas” or “navajuelas” in Spanish--speaking countries – are one of continent’s best--kept secrets.

 

Travel in Central or South America and you’ll find it hard to avoid the succulent and once- considered sacred avocado, not only because these fruits are often the size of footballs in their native territory, but because they’re loved and cherished in the regional diet.

 

The history of Avocado

 

The fleshy green fruit is native to Mexico, with archaeologists having found evidence of avocado eating in a cave in the Mexican state of Puebla dating back as far as 10,000 BC.

 

“The Distillers have found out a way to hit the palate of the Poor, by their new fashion'd compound Waters called ‘Geneva’, so that the common People seem not to value the French brandy as usual, and even not to desire it.” So wrote Robinson Crusoe author Daniel Defoe in 1726.

 

Is there a more English meal than a roasted joint of glistening beef, served with Yorkshire pudding and roast potatoes and slathered in rich gravy? Just see Richard Leveridge's 1735 song “Roast beef of Old England” for proof (dodgy rhyming scheme aside):

 

Taste Origins

Tales from Taste Lovers

Once upon a Bite

Carmen Miranda and her fruit hats

In the opening scene of The Gang’s All Here, the most expensive movie made by Twentieth Century Fox in 1943, a steamship called the SS Brazil is relieved of its cargo.

Carmen Miranda and her fruit hats

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