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Taste enthusiast? Life explorer? You’ve come to the right place. Let’s travel together through the culture of flavors and conviviality. Discover curiosities, learn about the most peculiar recipes and ingredients as well as the quintessentials. Be inspired by experiences of the finest taste experts.

Travel

Taste Guides

 

A journey through local flavors

  • NØRREBRONX

    In the northern part of the city lies the neighbourhood of Nørrebro, where edgy style has replaced dereliction without sacrificing a multicultural vibe. Locals still call it Nørrebronx in honour of its reputation for gangland shootouts, but the area has gone through a transformation over the past decade. The best place to witness this is on Jægersborggade, where The Coffee Collective set up its first open roaster and coffee shop in 2008. At that stage the street was better known for drug dealing than café society – let alone the Michelin star that now adorns Relæ (another pioneer). Now the area is a haven for ceramics and artisan homeware, handcrafted clothes, good food and, of course, great coffee. The surrounding streets are the city’s highest-density residential areas, and contain Denmark’s biggest mix of cultures. Hip young locals call it home, but clever urban planning has ensured that it hasn’t become over-gentrified. Vacant land has been turned into a green bike route that snakes its way through Superkilen Park, where there are 57 everyday objects that represent the area’s 57 different cultural backgrounds. There are still dive bars, kebab shops and graffiti to be found, and in summer, when the likes of Manfreds and Mikkeller set up their street furniture, the cobblestones come alive. 

DE

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2017-03-10
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2017-03-10

US

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2017-02-10
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2017-02-10

DK

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2017-01-20

ES

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2016-12-16
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2016-12-16

IT

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2016-11-18
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2016-11-18

CA

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IR

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2016-08-31

CH

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2016-06-20
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2016-06-20

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Taste Inspirations

More Secrets of taste

 

A stroll through the history of the most beloved ingredients

Copenhagen is a city built on fish. Herring – or “sild” in Danish – has been fished in the waters off Denmark for thousands of years. It was the “silver of the sea”, a never-ending supply of food, and in turn wealth, that helped establish the Scandinavian city.

 

“Hunger is the best sauce in the world,” wrote Cervantes in what is perhaps Spain’s most famous book, Don Quixote (1605). That may be true, but the country’s wealth of ingredients and dishes born of strong regional traditions means that even if you’re not hungry, you’re probably going to want to eat anyway.

 

Amidst the holm oak of the Dehesa, a scrubby pasture dotted with trees that runs along the Portuguese border in western Spain, large black pigs snuffle contentedly for fallen acorns. It is here that one of Spain’s greatest and most expensive foodstuffs begins its life: Jamón Ibérico de bellota (Iberian acorn ham).

 

In late August, something takes hold of Italians. It’s not a fever as such, but a lust, a kind of earthy hunger. They’re hungry for mushrooms, for the porcini that sprout in the wooded hills of Piedmont, Tuscany, Emilia-Romagna, Umbria and the hills in Veneto. The 16th-century Italian naturalist and botanist Costanzo Felici once described the mushroom as “a very eccentric and dangerous food, better kept away from the table than dished up on it”.

Taste Origins

Tales from Taste Lovers

Once upon a Bite

Salvador Dalí: Sea Urchins & Pomegranates

In painter Salvador Dalí’s world, the sacred and the erotic, the mystical and the gastronomic merged in an ecstatic flow of images and ideas.

Salvador Dalí: Sea Urchins & Pomegranates

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